Albania climbs to 62nd spot in global gender equality index

Tirana Times
By Tirana Times October 31, 2016 14:57

Albania climbs to 62nd spot in global gender equality index

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  • The report ranks Albania among Eastern Europe's best performers, leaving behind several regional competitors and even some EU member countries

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TIRANA, Oct. 31 – Albania climbed eight steps to rank 62nd among 144 economies in the latest Global Gender Gap report as the country narrowed the gap between men and women in access to health, education, economy and politics.

The 2016 report published by the World Economic Forum, a Switzerland-based think tank, marks Albania’s best result in the past decade since the inaugural 2006 edition when Albania ranked 61st out of 115 countries.

“Albania (62) climbs several ranks on the back of progress towards closing its gender gap in primary and secondary school enrolment, making up for some of its slow progress on these dimensions over the past decade,” the report noted.

The report ranks Albania among Eastern Europe’s best performers, leaving behind several regional competitors and even some EU member countries.

Albania achieved its best result in the political empowerment where it ranked 53th on higher number of women in parliament and women holding ministerial positions.

The 140-seat Albanian Parliament currently has a record number of 33 women MPs, accounting for 23.5 percent of total seats. The 30 percent gender quota for women’s participation in the MP candidate lists was set in the 2008 Electoral Code changes but resulted in only 23 women MPs or 16 percent of the 140 seat Parliament in the 2009 elections.

The Albanian government also features eight female ministers in its 21-member cabinet.

Albania ranks slightly worse on economic participation and opportunity (73rd) with poor female labour force participation and estimated earned income compared to men.

The country ranks worst in the ‘health and survival’ index with the sex ratio at birth at a female to male ratio of 0.91, indicating the presence of sex-selective abortions.

In 2015, there were 109.5 boys for each 100 girls, according to INSTAT, the state statistical office.

Traditionally Albanian families have favored boys over girls for two main reasons: the inheritance of the family name and the prospect of boys growing up to become breadwinners.

“All things held equal, with current trends, the overall global gender gap can be closed in 83 years across the 107 countries covered since the inception of the Global Gender Gap Report—just within the statistical lifetime of baby girls born today,” notes the report.

 

Tirana Times
By Tirana Times October 31, 2016 14:57