COD inaugurates ‘Myrtis: face to face with the past’ exhibition

Tirana Times
By Tirana Times September 13, 2018 11:36

COD inaugurates ‘Myrtis: face to face with the past’ exhibition

Story Highlights

  • In 2010 Myrtis became a friend of the UN Millennium Development Goals, joining its global campaign ‘’We can End Poverty.’’ Her face is a symbol in Greece and in other countries, asking governments to save children’s lives of dying from preventable diseases, such as typhoid.

Related Articles

TIRANA, Sept. 13 - The Centre for Openness and Dialogue will open on Friday, Sept. 14, the exhibition titled ‘Myrtis: face to face with the past’ – a special exhibition that comes for the first time in Albania straight from Greece’s greatest museums.

The exhibition brings at the COD spaces, for the first time, a variety of archeological and technological objects, paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings and installations.

In Athens, Greece, there is an area called Kerameikos, where a massive grave of ancient skeletons used to lay. In 1995, when diggings for the metro construction were underway, the skull of a little girl from the 5th century BC was discovered. The skull was well-preserved, considering the time, and had all its permanent teeth remaining and some of its primary teeth, too. Using these features, it was estimated that the little girl died out of the typhoid epidemic that hit Athens around 430-427 BC and was around 11 years old.

Since the girl’s skull still preserved her teeth, it allowed a facial reconstruction. Orthodontics professor Manolis Papagrigorakis from the Dentistry department of Athens University shaped the face, whereas the reconstruction was made with the collaboration of doctors, sculptors, archeologists, and other experts of the field.

The little girl was given the name of Myrtida, a popular Greek name for women at the time, but she’s best renowned as Myrtis.

For archaeologists and historians, the face of this little girl has brought to life a very important aspect of Greek history and has responded to the causes of the loss of many Athenians.

Myrtis also became a special girl for the United Nations. Eight years ago, she became a “UN friend” and has now been resurrected to become a powerful voice in preventing diseases affecting children.

In 2010 Myrtis became a friend of the UN Millennium Development Goals, joining its global campaign ‘’We can End Poverty.’’ Her face is a symbol in Greece and in other countries, asking governments to save children’s lives of dying from preventable diseases, such as typhoid.

Back in 5th century BC, the epidemic in Greece killed 1 in 3 people including Pericles, Athens’ leader then, and nowadays, typhoid affects over 21 million people, causing 200,000 deaths annually. Child mortality of preventable causes is estimated at around 15,000 deaths daily.

This exhibition unfolds its reconstructed face, accompanied by scriptures and images that bring the world she lived in back to life, her efforts, her challenges and simultaneously bringing back to life the Pericles era and the Peloponnesian War.

The exhibition will remain open for the public until Oct. 6 and there is no entry fee.

 

Tirana Times
By Tirana Times September 13, 2018 11:36