New Albania reform to merge dozens of inspectorates into six

Tirana Times
By Tirana Times February 19, 2019 15:42

New Albania reform to merge dozens of inspectorates into six

TIRANA, Feb. 19 – The Albanian government has unveiled legal changes that will merge some 30 inspection bodies into six big inspectorates in a deregulation reform that targets improving inspection standards and reducing frequent controls by various overlapping units, one of the key concerns for the business community in the country.

Currently, Albania has some 15 inspection units that are part of the Central Inspectorate and another 14 units with inspection powers carrying out thousands of field inspections that are estimated to take businesses 15 working days a year, a significant administrative barrier that is estimated to hamper normal business operation and increase operating costs for doing business in the country.

The newly proposed inspectorates will focus on ‘health and food,’ ‘environment and territory’ ‘industry and technology’ ‘transport and infrastructure’ ‘economy’ and ‘social affairs,’ replacing dozens of central and local government inspection units into six inspection bodies that will be supervised by a new General State Inspectorate.

The cut in the number of inspectorates is part of a deregulation reform that Albania has undertaken to improve the business climate and cut administrative barriers for enterprises operating in the country.

While the legal changes have not yet been approved by the government and could undergo further changes when submitted to Parliament for final approval, no details have been unveiled whether the reform will affect the number of inspectors.

Albania currently has some 2,000 inspectors, of whom 500 working for local government units that mostly supervise constructions.

Back in early 2017, Albania launched e-inspections in a bid to increase transparency, reduce corruption and improve the climate of doing business in the country.

Albania conducted some 83,000 inspections in 2017, of which 16 percent were carried out electronically, in costs that are estimated at 15 working days for businesses, according to a report by the Albanian Investment Council, a government advisory body.

The reform also comes as Albania hopes to launch long-awaited accession talks with the European Union this year and bring food and safety standards in line with EU legislation.

The latest World Bank Doing Business report showed Albania climbed only two steps to rank 63rd out of 190 global economies for the ease of doing business, continuing to lag behind most of its regional competitors.

 

Tirana Times
By Tirana Times February 19, 2019 15:42